‘Less’ by Andrew Sean Greer-winner of The Pulitzer Prize for fiction

Who says you can’t run away from your problems?

You are a failed novelist about to turn fifty. A wedding invitation arrives in the mail: your boyfriend of the past nine years is engaged to someone else. You can’t say yes–it would be too awkward–and you can’t say no–it would look like defeat. On your desk are a series of invitations to half-baked literary events around the world.

QUESTION: How do you arrange to skip town?

ANSWER: You accept them all. Goodreads

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Love for all Seasons Charity Anthology

Love stories for all seasons.

RJ Scott brings authors together in an anthology that reveals true love always deserves a happy ending, whatever the season.

With characters who find love in a New York park, or on a college campus, in the middle of a snow storm or in the heat of summer, ‘Love for all Seasons’ delivers romance for everyone.

Including stories from three authors, new to the world of writing MM romance.

All proceeds will go to The Albert Kennedy Trust and Matthew Shepard Foundation embracing diversity.

RELEASE DATE – 19 April

Love for all Seasons

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Palm Sunday/Branch Sunday

Yesterday must have been quite the green spring day on certain parts of the continent. Willow branches are the best, my grandmother used to say when she’d sent us by the stream to acquire some for her.

The Pentecost, the fifty days of Easter, marks the beginning of many outdoor and springtime activities in Eastern Europe. Green is the colour from now on, and wild flowers and tree branches adorning gates and doorways are a must, because this is not about the man-made stay-green year around nature that normally sprinkles our urban cement or earth beaten paths dwellings to be sure.

This must be done specifically and purposefully because the first Sunday after the Pentecost is considered the All Saints’/All souls’ Sunday, around there.

On Holy Thursday during the holy week of Easter the gates of heaven and hell are said to be open to allow Jesus’s soul to enter and, afterwards, to exit the celestial realm again. This means, of course, that the doors are also open for all the other souls existing in heaven or hell, which allows them the opportunity to cross over and visit the earthen realm once more, if so they wish it. Or if they are called home by someone back here.

In medieval Europe, fires were lit outdoors and candles were burned in every room to guide the souls straight back to their respective earthly homes where they were thus obviously wanted and expected. This was also supposed to prevent them aimlessly haunting other folk’s places, by mistake. Some say that a household protected by linden branches will keep the evil souls away while allowing the right ones in.

 

Memory Chest at Smashwords

Memory Chest at Amazon

Memory Chest & excerpt at MLR Press

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Turkish Garbage Collectors Open Library Full of Discarded Books By Thom Peart

Turkish Garbage Collectors Open Library Full of Discarded Books

Turkish garbage collectors in the country’s capital city of Ankara have opened a public library that is full of books that were originally destined to be put into landfill. The workers began collecting discarded books and opened the new library in the Çankaya district of Ankara. News of the library has spread and now people have begun donating books directly to the library, rather than throwing them away.

Call to Arms Anthology

Call to Arms

Modern LGBTQ+ fiction of the Second World War

Seventeen stories, thirteen authors, a second war. Once again Manifold Press’s writers explore the lives of LGBTQ+ people and their war-time experience in cities, towns and countryside across the world.

Amidst war and peace, in the thick of violence or in an unexpected lull, these stories of the Second World War take the reader far and wide: through Britain, Europe, Asia and South America, from loss and parting to love and homecoming. As for home, it may be an ordinary house, or a prison camp, or a ship: but it is, in the end, where you find it, however far you have to go. Read this book, and make the journey yourself.

An anthology edited by Heloise Mezen.

All proceeds will be donated to the British Refugee Council.

A Conversation

Loved these books! Thanks #JulieBozza #ElinGregory

Elin Gregory

To celebrate the fact that we both have relatively new releases Julie Bozza suggested we have a bit of a chat about our work. Chatting is always fun and so is Julie, so I jumped at the chance. This is the result:

An interview that turned into a conversation between Elin Gregory, author of The Bones of Our Fathers, and Julie Bozza, author of A Night with the Knight of the Burning Pestle.

Experience and/or Research?

Julie: Congratulations on your lovely new novel, The Bones of Our Fathers. I loved reading it and gaining an insight into an area of work that I’m unfamiliar with – though like most jobs it seems a mix of 5% excitement and 95% routine! I understand you were drawing on your own work experience. What was it like to write about something that is ‘everyday’ for you? Have you done that before, with this…

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“The Thinker and the Lover,” Henriette mused

The Art Dive

Mira Tudor_Poets, Artists, Lovers. A Novel_ebook cover_blog_smThe Thinker and the Lover,” Henriette mused as her eyes glided over the movie poster. “Interesting. ‘Inspired by the novel Narcissus and Goldmund by Hermann Hesse.’” She turned to Ela and Pamfil. “Have you read this book?”

“No,” they both said in unison.

“So does this mean the thinker doesn’t love, and the lover doesn’t think?” Henriette quipped, heartily amused at the notion.

“We’ll see,” Pamfil said. “I imagine it’s probably about personality dominants than a clear-cut dichotomy. I read somewhere that the ‘lover’ is an artist, so he clearly thinks a bit,” he added with a smile.

Some two hours later they were outside again, walking down Dacia Boulevard to Romana Square.

“So how did you like it?” Pamfil asked.

“I liked that the artist was also a wanderer. Many artists are wanderers at heart,” Henriette said.

“I felt sad for the scholar,” Pamfil said. “He helped…

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